MS. BOOTY

with

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Co-creator of Team 3XT

FERLY PRADO

Ferly has been a professional dancer for 17 years. Her passion for fitness and nutrition led her to get certified under NASM and Precision Nutrition.

 

 

If you have sensitive knees you might need a mat for this workout.

OPTIONAL to wear ANKLE WEIGHTS.

Enjoy!

WORKOUT VIDEO:

ALL RISE!

 

In order to see change, you have to stress out the muscle. Break it down, so it can rebuild itself stronger.

These exercises engage the hamstring a lot, encouraging that natural "booty lift". Embrace the burn. There's a reason we do ALL the exercises on one side before switching to the other side. Hang in there.

 

By adding weights (ankle weights) you are "adding to the stress". It will make the muscle work harder, creating tiny breakage of the muscle fibers. As soon as you stop exercising, your body goes to work on rebuilding the muscle. That's why it's important to make sure you get plenty of good quality protein in your diet, so your body has good raw material to work with when rebuilding the muscle(s).

IF YOU PREFER TO DO THESE EXERCISES ON YOUR ELBOWS, YOU CAN DO THAT! I just encourage you to keep your spine neutral and protected (by engaging the abdominals).

Happy (Booty) Lifting!

XOXO

Ferly

15 THINGS YOU DIDN'T KNOW THE PURPOSE OF!

Who doesn't love some "ohhhh!!!" moments? Enjoy!

 

-Ferly

 

Does Alcohol Affect My Health and Fitness?

 

 

The answer isn’t that straight forward.

 

But what about those studies that say drinking is actually good for you? Like:

 

  • “Moderate alcohol intake is associated with a lower risk of diabetes, gallstones, and coronary heart disease.”

  • “Light to moderate drinking seems to be good for the heart and circulatory system, helping reduce your risk of cardiac arrest and clot-caused stroke by 25 to 40 percent.”

  • “And there have been several studies indicating that drinkers — even heavy drinkers — actually outlive people who don’t drink.”

So doesn't this mean Alcohol is good for you?

 

Let's put it this way...

  IF YOU DON’T ALREADY DRINK, HEALTH EXPERT RECOMMEND YOU DON’T START.  

 

But… wait? What about these studies results I just read above?

 

“... no one knows if any amount of alcohol is actually good for all of us.

 Most of the research on alcohol’s potential health benefits are large, long-term epidemiological studies.

Rather than showing that X causes Y, it simply says that X seems to be correlated with Y.”

 

Correlated does not necessarily means Causing.

Yes, alcohol consumption raises levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol, it may reduce stress. Or it may have NO health benefit at all. It could simply be that alcohol drinkers have good genes, a lower-stress personality, a particular lifestyle, or good social connections and support. All could contribute to a healthy heart.

 

 

  “And most of the research indicates that you’d have to be a light to moderate drinker with no heavy drinking episodes (even isolated ones) to see a heart benefit.”  

 

 

So now let’s define "moderation".

 

According to the United States Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, “moderate drinking” means, on average:

  • For women: up to seven drinks per week, with no more than three drinks on any single day.

  • For men: up to 14 drinks per week, with no more than four drinks on any single day.

And here’s a guide to health-agency classified “drinks”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Studies show that people routinely, sometimes drastically, underestimate their alcohol consumption.

That’s a big problem, since heavy drinking comes with a much higher risk of major health problems.”

 MODERATE                                                          HEAVY 

 

 

*Particularly if there’s alcoholism in your family

**If drinking causes you to eat more food or opt for energy-dense meals

 

 

 

One of the systems responsible for breaking down alcohol in your system (from ethanol to acetaldehyde, then to acetate, then to carbon dioxide and water) is the MEOS (microsomal ethanol oxidizing system). In moderate drinkers, only about 10% of ethanol processing is done by the MEOS. In heavy drinkers, this system kicks in way harder. “This means the MEOS may be less available to process other toxins in your body. Oxidative cell damage, and harm from high alcohol intake, then goes up.”

 

WE MUST METABOLIZE ALCOHOL, CHANGE IT IN ESSENCE, TO TOLERATE IT. And we all metabolize it very differently due to factors like genetic tolerance, ethnicity and genetic background, our age, our body size, our gender, our individual combinations of conversion enzymes, etc.

 

“The moderate-vs-heavy guidelines are the experts’ best guess at the amount of alcohol that can be consumed with statistically minimal risk, while still accounting for what a lot of people are probably going to do anyway: drink.

It doesn’t mean that moderate drinking is risk-free."

 

 

DRINKING IS FUN!

For many of, this is a true statement! Alcohol gives you pleasure, a sense of relaxation, opens up creativity in some people (helps you think outside the box), it can give you a sense of social connection.

  “Drinking or not drinking isn’t about “healthy vs. not”. It’s about tradeoffs."  

 

The decision TO DRINK or NOT TO DRINK should be dependent on your personal goals.

 

It may be a simple “yes” or “no”.

  • Saying "yes" to six-pack abs might mean saying “no” to a few drinks at the bar.

  • Saying “yes” to Friday happy hour might mean saying “no” to your Saturday morning workout.

  • Saying “yes” to marathon training might mean saying “no” to boozy Sunday brunches.

  • Saying “yes” to better sleep (and focus, and mood) might mean saying “no” to your daily wine with dinner.

  • Saying “yes” to moderate alcohol consumption might mean finding a way to say “no” to stress triggers (or human triggers) that make you want to drink more.

Or it may be where you’re willing to move along the continuum.

  • Maybe you’re willing to practice drinking more slowly and mindfully, but you’re not willing to decrease your total alcohol intake.

  • Maybe you’re trying to lose weight, so you’d consider drinking a little less. Like 2 beers instead of 3, but not 0.

  • Or, maybe you’re willing to stay sober during most social situations, but you’re not willing to endure your partner’s office party without a G&T on hand.

 

"You can write your own 'Owner’s Manual' for YOU as a unique individual.

Guidelines for drinking don’t tell us who YOU are or what effects alcohol has on YOU.

So let’s forget about 'expert' advice for just a moment.

Instead, let’s try letting your body lead.”

 

 

  TODAY’S NUTRITIONAL CHALLENGE IS BASED ON SOME TIPS FROM PRECISION NUTRITION.  

1. Observe your drinking habits: Keep track of all the alcohol you drink for a week or two (here’s a worksheet to help you).

 

Next, review the data. Ask:

  • Am I drinking more than I thought? 

  • Is my drinking urgent, mindless, or rushed? Slamming drinks back without stopping to savor them can be a sign that drinking is habitual, not purposeful.

  • Are there themes or patterns in my drinking? Perhaps you habitually drink on a Friday because your job is really stressful.

  • Is alcohol helping me enjoy life, or is it stressing me out? If you’re not sleeping well or feeling worried about the drinking, the cost can outweigh the benefit.

  • Does alcohol bring any unwanted friends to the party? Binge eating, drug use, texting your ex?

If any of the answers to these questions raise red flags for you, consider cutting back and seeing how you feel.

 

 

2. Notice how alcohol affects your body.

  • Do I generally feel good? Simple, but telling.

  • Am I recovering? How’s my physical performance after drinking? If I were to hit the gym on Saturday morning after a Friday night social, how would I feel and perform?

  • What happens afterwards? Do I get a hangover, upset stomach, poor sleep, puffiness/bloating and/or other discomfort?

  • How does the extra energy intake work for my goals? Is alcohol adding some calories that I don’t want? Am I trying to lose weight, for instance?

  • What do my other physiological indicators say? How’s my blood work? My blood pressure?

If you’re unsure about whether your alcohol use is helping or hurting you, talk to your doctor and get a read on your overall health.

WRITE YOUR FINDINGS ON THAT SAME PIECE OF PAPER AS #1.

 

 

3. Notice how alcohol affects your thoughts, emotions, assumptions, and general perspective on life.

  • Do you feel in control of your drinking? Are you choosing, deliberately and purposefully… or “finding yourself” drinking?

  • What kind of person are you when you are drinking? Are you a bon vivant, just slightly wittier and more relaxed, savoring a craft beer with friends? Or are you thinking, Let’s make that crap circus of a workday go away, as you pound back the liquid emotional anesthetic through gritted teeth?

  • If you had to stop drinking for a week, what would that be like? No big deal? Or did you feel mild panic when you read that question?

WRITE ONE SENTENCE DOWN ADDRESSING THESE 3. 

Example: I do feel in control when I am drinking; I feel a bit more relaxed and happier when I drink (I don’t overthink nearly as much); and if I was to stop drinking for a week, I could do it (in fact, I’ve done it many times).

 

4. Disrupt the autopilot.

One of the keys to behavior change is moving from unconscious (automatic reactions) to conscious (deliberate decisions).

To experiment with decreasing your alcohol intake, try these strategies:

  • Delay your next drink. Just for 10 minutes, to see if you still want it.

  • Look for ways to circumvent your patterns. If you usually hit the bar after work, try booking an alcohol-free activity (like a movie date or a yoga class) with a friend instead. If you stock up on beer at the grocery store, skip that aisle altogether and pick up some quality teas or sparkling water instead.

  • Savor your drink. Tune into the sensations in front of you. Here’s an idea: try tasting wine like a sommelier. Look at it, swirl it, sniff it, taste it.

  • Swap quantity for quality. Drink less, but when you do drink, treat yourself to the good stuff.

WRITE ONE SENTENCE ON YOUR THOUGHTS ABOUT YOU AND AUTOPILOT DRINKING.

Example: Yup! I definitely autopilot on my drinking. As soon as I turn on NETFLIX, I grab that glass of wine. I want to try grabing a water bottle first before grabbing that glass of wine at the sight of NETFLIX. Maybe I can try that for a week and see what I feel.

 

Additional advice: Call on the experts.

Change almost always works better with support. It’s hard to change alone.

  • Talk to your doctor about your drinking patterns and your health.

  • Consider genetic testing. Many commercial genetic testing services can tell you about your alcohol tolerance, or your risk of other chronic diseases (such as breast cancer) that are linked to alcohol intake.

  • Get nutrition coaching.

 

 

Lastly, If you choose to drink, enjoy it.

Savor it. Enjoy it mindfully, ideally among good company.

 

 

 

HERE’S THE BONUS CHALLENGE:

Review everything you have written above.

You may choose (or not) ONE of these challenges below to commit to that you feel best fits into your needs and wants:

 

  • Only one drink a day for 4 weeks.

  • No drinking week days, and enjoy my favorite drinks on the weekend (Women 3 drinks/day; Men 4 drinks/day).

  • No drinking for a month to reset my mind and body.

 

 

 

 

Happy Living!

 

XOXO

Ferly

 

 

 

 

Adapted and  from Article “Would I be healthier if I quit drinking?” by Camille DePutter

 

CONGRATULATIONS

on completing today's challenge!

We are impressed!

 

Being committed to this healthy-living and body-honoring challenge makes you a badass in our book! We'll see you tomorrow!

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